13-Year Old Mongolian Eagle Hunters

by Asher Svidensky

During my last voyage to Mongolia, I flew over to Ulgii (or ölgii), the capital of the far west. I went there in order to document the Kazakh eagle hunters’ lives in west Mongolia. These eagle hunters, who preserve an old tradition that’s passed from generation to generation, tame eagles and use them for hunting smaller animals, such as foxes and marmots. The eagle hunter’s families live on this side of Mongolia after having migrated between Kazakhstan, Russia and Mongolia until the fall of communism and closing of all borders. The tradition’s preservation was what drew me to them. They preserve it without any touristic nature, unlike in Kazakhstan. These Kazakh eagle hunters, who live in Mongolia today, are the last ones on earth who still deserve the title “Eagle Hunter”. It is not merely a title to them, but a way of life.

At first, I was doing everything according to my plan. I hired a chauffeur and a local translator who would guide me and take me to the eagle hunter’s families in the mountains. I made sure I would spend at least a day with every family for the sake of personally getting to know them. I had played with the children and I had taken photos that document their way of life’s atmosphere. Afterwards, I had gone to the mountains with the family’s father, and documented him over the course of a hunt. I also photographed him during sunset, on horseback, proudly holding on to his golden eagle.

On the way back from the mountains, however, it felt like something was missing. I felt like all the photos I’d taken over the last few days were a mere reflection of previous photos and stories, distinguished only by slight light and place differences. It wasn’t enough for me. I knew I had to find another way and tell a new story that was not yet told in the snowy Mongolian mountains. (Read more)

6 days ago 192 notes

meganleppla:

Pressing Plants

 

Why?
By hunting and collecting plants you can create something beautiful and informative. Take a nature walk and carefully collect some specimens that you find fascinating. Any heavy book will help flatten the plants, and wax paper can seal them off for display. Plant hunting has been happening for centuries, and is an important activity for any budding botanist.

What else?
Pressing plants provides a window into the plant kingdom. Explore the plants in your environment, collect some specimens, and record your findings. More curriculum connectors can be found here.

1 month ago 476 notes

A Man Takes A Single Rake to The Beach. And When You Zoom Out And See It… Mind BLOWN.

If you live in San Francisco, California, then you may be lucky enough to come across the art of Andres Amador. He doesn’t paint or sculpt. He prefers a medium that is temporary but absolutely beautiful: a sandy beach at low tide. He uses a rake to create works of art that can be bigger than 100,000 sq. ft.

He spends hours creating these intricate masterpieces, knowing that the tide will soon come in and wash away his work forever. More here.

Source: ViralNova

2 months ago 969 notes