DIYer Ogel recreated the banner for the DIY: Animated Series completely out of duct tape. For more updates on the series, check out Isaiah Saxon’s blog.

1 day ago 52 notes

DIY member Ogel recreated the DIY TV banner entirely out of duct tape!

1 month ago 76 notes

meganleppla:

Stenciling

 

Why?
Stencils are an excellent tool for rapidly reproducing the same design over and over again. The process can be done simply by cutting away from a piece of material like cardboard, plastic, or even paper. Once paint is applied, it moves through the cutout and onto your surface of choice – revealing a sweet design! Stenciling began in the prehistoric period when hands acted as stencils on cave walls. Today intricate stencils are used by many street artists to tell their story in public places.

What else?
Stencils make a great tool for visual storytelling. Design a stencil that sends a message to others, and display that message publicly. More curriculum connectors can be found here.

1 month ago 349 notes

A Man Takes A Single Rake to The Beach. And When You Zoom Out And See It… Mind BLOWN.

If you live in San Francisco, California, then you may be lucky enough to come across the art of Andres Amador. He doesn’t paint or sculpt. He prefers a medium that is temporary but absolutely beautiful: a sandy beach at low tide. He uses a rake to create works of art that can be bigger than 100,000 sq. ft.

He spends hours creating these intricate masterpieces, knowing that the tide will soon come in and wash away his work forever. More here.

Source: ViralNova

2 months ago 969 notes

meganleppla:

Crafting Cartonería

I get it, teachers are short on time. So I’m working on resources that cut to the chase. I whipped up this gif on how to make sculptures with a shoestring budget, inspired by the Mexican handcraft Cartonería.

How?
It’s all there in the gif, but if you’re the type that likes the details, you can see more here.

Why?
Papier-mâché projects often get a bad rap for being the stuff of kindergarten craft time, but the process of paper-crafting is rich with history. Cartonería, as papier-mâché is called in Mexico, has long been a traditional handcraft. The Mexican papermaking process dates back to the Mesoamerican period, was temporarily banned by the Spanish, and paper sculptures are still made to this day to tell the story of yearly celebrations.

What else?
Making Cartonería has the obvious connection to history and social studies. Cartonería also serves as an excellent project to talk about life sciences and geometry. More on curriculum connectors here.

3 months ago 177 notes